Mexico-City
Mexico City, Mexico

Mexico City is one of the most important economic hubs in Latin America. The city proper (Federal District) produces 21.8% of the country’s gross domestic product. According to a study conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers, Mexico City had a GDP of $390 billion, ranking as the eighth richest city in the world after the greater areas of Tokyo, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Paris, London and Osaka/Kobe, and the richest in the whole of Latin America, as measured by the GDP of the entire Metropolitan area. making Mexico City alone the 30th largest economy in the world. Mexico City is the greatest contributor to the country’s industrial GDP (15.8%) and also the greatest contributor to the country’s GDP in the service sector (25.3%). Due to the limited non-urbanized space at the south – most of which is protected through environmental laws – the contribution of the Federal District in agriculture is the smallest of all federal entities in the country. Mexico City has one of the world’s fastest-growing economies and its GDP is set to double. Mexico City has an HDI index of 0.915 identical to that of the Republic of Korea. The level of household expenditure in Mexico City is close to that of an average household in Germany or Japan. The top twelve percent of GDP per capita holders in the city had a mean disposable income of US $98,517. The high spending power of Mexico City inhabitants makes the city attractive for companies offering prestige and luxury goods

Monterrey
Monterrey, Mexico

Monterrey is a major industrial center in northern Mexico, producing a GDP of 78.5 billion US dollars. The city’s GDP per capita is 607,042 Mexican pesos or $46,634 US dollars. The city is rated by Fortune magazine as the best city in Latin America for business and is currently ranked third best by the América Economía magazine. The city has prominent positions in sectors such as steel, cement, glass, auto parts, and brewing. The city’s economic wealth has been attributed in part to its proximity with the United States-Mexican border and economic links to the United States. Industrialization was accelerated in the mid-19th century by the Compañia Fundidora de Fierro y Acero Monterrey, a steel-processing company. Today, Monterrey is home to transnational conglomerates such as Cemex (the world’s third largest cement company), FEMSA (Coca-Cola Latin America, largest independent Coca-Cola bottler in the world), Alfa (petrochemicals, food, telecommunications and auto parts), Axtel (telecommunications), Vitro (glass), Selther (leading mattress and rest systems firm in Latin America), Gruma (food), and Banorte (financial services). The FEMSA corporation owned a large brewery, the Cuauhtémoc Moctezuma Brewery (Cervecería Cuauhtémoc Moctezuma) that produces the brands Sol, Tecate, Indio, Dos Equis and Carta Blanca among others, in the beginning of the year Cuauhtémoc Moctezuma Brewery was sold to Dutch-based company Heineken. By the end of the same year, there were more than 13,000 manufacturing companies, 55,000 retail stores, and more than 52,000 service firms in Monterrey.